Peanut Butter Granola

Untitled

After deciding to venture away from familiar old-fashioned oats for a little while, I’ve quickly become a spelt flakes, rye flakes, and kamut flakes convert.

One of the pretty obvious ways I love to use (most of) them is in granola: I adapted this recipe because I can never get enough peanut butter action, but I wanted to use less oil, no add-ins, and a chunk less sugar as well.
If you’re only into granola when it has big clusters to show for it, then it’s highly likely you’re going to love this one too.

Untitled

You can use a combo of rye flakes and spelt flakes (pictured above), or use only one kind. I haven’t gotten a chance to try brown rice flakes yet, but I bet they’re great too.
I don’t recommend using kamut flakes in granola because I find them to be excessively chewy and far less enjoyable than when used in recipes where they’re soaked a bit before eating.

Sometimes I replace 1 cup of the flakes with 1 cup of whole grain nuggets. Mostly because I bought these and all the flakes mentioned above in mass quantity, and need to (happily) finish them before hitting the expiration date. Considering how fast we go through this granola, it shouldn’t be a problem.

I occasionally use dark chocolate peanut butter instead of natural peanut butter; as a matter of fact, the granola pictured at the top of this post was made with chocolaty nut butter. It’s only a matter of time before I try it with almond butter too.
Note that there’s not a huge difference in the granola’s sweetness levels when using dark chocolate peanut butter, even though it’s sweetened and natural peanut butter isn’t, so there’s no need to adjust the amount of agave and Sucanat to make up for it.

A big splash of vegan milk on top, and you’re good to go.

Update: I’m adding my go-to version at the bottom of this page, so that I have it written down somewhere. It differs from the other one in that there is slightly less peanut butter, so that a full jar is used for the doubled recipe without having to open another one, and it also contains half the amount of wheat germ. I realize that it can make for a costly granola, but the yield is impressive, and the granola itself is also quite filling, so you don’t need to eat lots of it in one shot in order to feel satisfied.
Also, it makes such a huge amount that it’s best to use a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment to stir it, unless your wrists are made of steel and your biceps are hot stuff.

Untitled

(New) Peanut Butter Granola:
Adapted from The Kitchn

1/2 cup (168 g) organic agave nectar or (120 ml) pure maple syrup
1/4 cup (48 g) Sucanat
1 cup (256 g) crunchy natural peanut butter or dark chocolate peanut butter
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 cup (60 ml) grapeseed oil or other neutral-flavored oil
Generous 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
3 cups (300 g) rolled spelt and/or rye flakes OR 2 cups (200 g) flakes + 1 cup (116 g) whole grain nuggets
1 cup (120 g) wheat germ

Preheat the oven to 300°F (150°C or gas mark 2). Have a large rimmed baking sheet handy, which you can line with parchment paper if you prefer; I never bother.
In a large bowl, combine the agave, Sucanat, peanut butter, vanilla, oil, salt, and cinnamon. Stir to emulsify.
Add the flakes (or flakes and nuggets) and wheat germ on top. Stir to thoroughly coat.
Evenly place the granola on the sheet, and bake in 10-minute increments, stirring after each increment, for a total of 20 to 30 minutes, until the granola looks dry and just slightly browned.
Let cool on the sheet. The granola will crisp up as it cools. Let cool completely before storing in an airtight container.
The granola will keep for up to two weeks in the refrigerator.

Yield: About 6 cups

My Favorite, Double-Recipe Version:

1 cup (336 g) organic agave nectar
1/2 cup (96 g) Sucanat
One 16-ounce (454 g) jar dark chocolate peanut butter
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup (120 ml) grapeseed oil or other neutral-flavored oil
Generous 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
4 cups (400 g) rolled rye flakes
2 cups (232 g) whole grain nuggets
1 cup (120 g) wheat germ

Preheat the oven to 300°F (150°C or gas mark 2). Have two large rimmed baking sheets handy, which you can line with parchment paper if you prefer; I never bother.
In a large bowl, combine the agave, Sucanat, peanut butter, vanilla, oil, salt, and cinnamon. Stir to emulsify.
Add the flakes, nuggets, and wheat germ on top. Stir to thoroughly coat.
Divide the granola among the two prepared sheets, and place it evenly. Bake in 10-minute increments, stirring after each increment, for a total of 20 to 30 minutes, until the granola looks dry and just barely browned.
Let cool on the sheet. The granola will crisp up as it cools. Let cool completely before storing in an airtight container.
The granola will keep for up to two weeks in the refrigerator.

Yield: About 12 cups

  • Rosa says:

    Scrumptious! Those rye flakes look really tasty.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • mihl says:

    Who walked over those flakes? I love that pattern. And your granola recipes of course <3

    • Celine says:

      Ha, yeah. I hadn’t noticed before but it really looks like someone stepped all over them. Payback’s gonna be a b…

  • Danielle P. says:

    Celine, I have to ask: what is that yellow instrument with a spout and a handle? I purchased a green one a few years ago because I loved the shape of it, but I have no idea what it’s supposed to be!

    • Celine says:

      They’re little dippers that were originally used to make Turkish coffee. I love the way they look too.

  • you had me at peanut butter! sounds so incredible! yum!

  • Josiane says:

    I’ve had granola on the mind lately, too. I’ve bought some buckwheat flakes, and they get way mushy (uh, actually, “they turn into glue” would be more accurate!) when I make porridge out of them, so I was thinking of turning them into granola, in the hope that that’d make them behave…
    I love the look of your granola. The big chunks are totally screaming “perfect thing to snack on”!

    • Celine says:

      Yeah I’m really not into cooking oats or flakes like these because of the mush factor, so I can only imagine how bad those buckwheat flakes must be. That’s a shame.